Deflection through Humanization

Saturday, February 4  |  8:30am to 9:30am

Law Enforcement is one of the most highly publicized and scrutinized professions in our society. There are cameras everywhere that are waiting for the opportunity to catch Law Enforcement responding to any situation. Law Enforcement officers must adapt to societal changes. We can’t control what the world gives us, but we can have a say in how we respond. Our responses and interactions can either change the perception of Law Enforcement in a positive or negative way. One way we can adapt with today’s world is by humanizing the people we interact with and humanizing Law Enforcement personnel. By using a human approach in our interactions, we can show the world a compassionate side of Law Enforcement, as well as help deflect people away from the Criminal Justice System and into areas where they can improve their quality of life.

PRESENTER: Todd Kessler, Corporal, Bucks County Sheriff’s Office

CPL Todd Kessler is a Veteran of the US Army. He has 7 years of active-duty service to include a tour of duty in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He also has a diagnosis of PTSD from his time overseas. He has been a member of the Sheriff’s Office in Bucks County, Pennsylvania for 10 years. During his time in the Sheriff’s Office, CPL Kessler has served as a SWAT/Crisis Negotiator and a Crisis Intervention Officer for 7 years. CPL Kessler is also a Certified Instructor in RITE training (Racial Intelligence Training & Engagement), as well as Mental Health First Aid (MHFA). In 2020, CPL Kessler created the Pathfinder Initiative for the Bucks County Sheriff’s Office, which is a specialized unit that assists the County of Bucks with mental health consumers, community/homeless outreach, as well as peer support.

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Providing Law Enforcement Agencies with Evidence of Immediate and Near Future Staffing Needs through use of an Enhanced Calculation Model

Saturday, February 4  |  8:30am to 9:30am

Law enforcement staffing is critical to an agency’s ability to ensure social order, fight crime and meet the needs of the jurisdiction it serves. To this end, law enforcement agencies must demonstrate staffing needs to mayors, county commissioners, and funding agencies to secure the resources necessary to hire additional deputies. Unfortunately, leading staffing models estimate staffing needs based on population to officer ratios or guesstimates of how deputies allocate their time on duty.

This presentation highlights findings from two COPS sponsored studies that employed the enhanced seven-step staffing calculation model to measure deputy time on duty per the nature, volume, and distribution of calls for service with attention to shift relief factor adjustments. The enhanced model provides empirical evidence regarding an agency’s staffing needs that in turn inform police executives’ immediate and near future staffing plans and hiring requests.

The enhanced model utilizes a mixed-methods approach involving quantitative analysis of official agency data and qualitative data collected through focus group interviews with patrol deputies to specify how their work time is allocated across dispatch, officer-initiated activities, and administrative duties. This presentation will include: 1) an overview of existing staffing models as well as an introduction to the enhanced model and its benefits; 2) definition and discussion of calls for service, dispatch, and shift-relief factors as they relate to the calculation of staffing needs; and 3) examples of how agencies can leverage findings from the enhanced calculation model to inform staffing requests.

PRESENTERS: Dr. Brenda Vose, Associate Professor and Chair,
Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of North Florida; Dr. J. Mitchell Miller, John A. Delaney Presidential Professor, University of North Florida; and Dr. Wesley Jennings, Gillespie Distinguished Scholar, Chair & Professor, University of Mississippi

Brenda Vose (Ph.D., 2008, University of Cincinnati) is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of North Florida where she teaches and researches in the areas of community corrections, offender assessment and classification, offender treatment, evidence-based interventions, and law enforcement staffing. Prior to joining the faculty at UNF, she was the Academic Director of the Online Master of Science Program in Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Given the size of the offender population, budgetary constraints, and the ever-present concern for public safety, she believes that research efforts are needed that aim to recognize the individual risks and needs of offenders and then identify, implement, and improve upon effective treatment strategies through collaborative research-practitioner partnerships. Her published work appears in Federal Probation, Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice and Behavior, Criminology and Public Policy, American Journal of Criminal Justice, and Policing: An International Journal. 

J. Mitchell Miller is the John A. Delaney Presidential Professor at the University of North Florida where he serves as Editor of the American Journal of Criminal Justice. Dr. Miller served on the College of Criminal Justice faculty at the University of South Carolina (1996-2006) and then as Chair & Professor in the Criminal Justice Department at UTSA (2006-2014) before joining UNF in 2014. He is one of only seven criminologists to have received all three of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences major accolades (Fellow, Founder’s Award, and Bruce Smith, Sr Award), is a Past President of the Southern Criminal Justice Association, and an American Society of Criminology Oral History Project Inductee. An FBI National Academy instructor, he is also the former lead evaluator of the Moscow Police Command College and author of over 200 scientific publications, Mitch is engaged in DOJ sponsored research-practitioner partnerships with sheriffs across the country.

Wesley G. Jennings, PhD, is Gillespie Distinguished Scholar, Chair, and Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice & Legal Studies in the School of Applied Sciences and a Faculty Affiliate at the School of Law at the University of Mississippi.  He has extensive experience working on federally-funded projects from agencies, including the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the U.S. Department of Justice’s COPS Office that involve research-practitioner partnerships. He is a world re-known policing scholar, who has widely published in areas such technology and policing, prediction models in policing, and police use-of-force. He has also been involved with conducting randomized controlled experiments and rigorous quasi-experimental designs with police agencies in the past. Lastly, he has served as the Co-Editor of the flagship policing peer-reviewed journal (Policing: An International Journal; formerly known as Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management) since 2013.

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Extraordinary Culture Through Intentional Design

Saturday, February 4  |  9:45am to 10:45am

Culture seems to be the new “buzzword” in law enforcement, but it’s so much more than a buzzword.  Agency culture directly impacts morale, recruiting, and most importantly, retention of the best employees.  Every agency has a culture; whether it’s healthy or unhealthy.  The key is to design the culture you want rather than accept the culture that emerges naturally.  Extraordinary culture does not happen by chance, it must be intentionally designed and implemented.  This course provides a proven framework that can be used to design the culture of any sized agency.  If you want better morale, lower turnover, and the ability to attract the best employees, this course will help you achieve each of these goals.

PRESENTERS: John Bostain, President, Command Presence Training

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School Shootings and Threat Assessments:
A Look at Potential Legal Issues Surrounding the Monitoring of Student Online Activity by Law Enforcement

Saturday, February 4  |  9:45am to 10:45pm

The vast majority of school shooters have shared their intent to carry out an attack in various ways including verbal statements, electronic messaging, and online social media posts.   Although the monitoring of student online activity is widely viewed as a viable and effective way to identify, assess, and intervene before a tragedy occurs, these measures raise several important legal questions. For example, at what point will this monitoring violate rights guaranteed by the First and Fourth Amendments of the Constitution or otherwise undermine educational privacy interests of the students involved?  Join us for a discussion of legal issues surrounding the monitoring of social medial accounts by law enforcement as a means of preventing school shootings.

PRESENTER: Mary Mara, Senior Legal Instructor, FLETC

Mary Mara is a Senior Legal Instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers in Glynco, Georgia where she provides legal instruction to federal law enforcement candidates on such critical topics as Constitutional Law, Federal Court Procedures, Federal Criminal Law, Courtroom Evidence, Electronic Law and Evidence and Officer Liability.   She has authored several law review articles including, most recently, an article entitled A Look at the Fourth Amendment Implications of Drone Surveillance by Law Enforcement Today, 9 ConLawNow 1 (2017).   Prior to joining FLETC in 2018, she served as an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney in Oakland County, Michigan for 11 years where she tried more than 100 capital felony cases with a special emphasis on the investigation and prosecution of child sexual predators.  She spent an additional 16 years defending law enforcement officers in federal district court against claims alleging civil rights violations under 42 U.S.C. § 1983.  She is a graduate of Michigan State University (BA 1987), Michigan State University College of Law (JD 1991 magna cum laude) and Western Michigan University (LLM Homeland and National Security, 2017, with high honors). 

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Elder Abuse Cases: A Guide for First Responders

Saturday, February 4  |  11:00am to 12:00pm

Within the U.S., 1 in 10 older adults experience elder abuse every year, and with the growing older adult population, elder abuse cases are increasing. Law enforcement personnel are among the first contact points for elder abuse cases. Elder abuse cases are often complex and multi-layered, involving physical, financial, emotional, and sexual abuse issues. This session, presented by The National Center on Elder Abuse, will cover the many aspects of elder abuse and innovative resources for intervention and prevention, including the Elder Abuse Guide for Law Enforcement (EAGLE).

EAGLE was created by law enforcement, for law enforcement. Learn successful techniques including multidisciplinary approaches, and proven methods of engagement with the older adult population. EAGLE tools will be showcased and then used during an interactive case scenario where Law Enforcement officers can enhance their elder abuse knowledge. EAGLE provides immediate access to state statutes on elder abuse, investigation resources, and roll call training videos based off real-life elder abuse cases.

In addition to available resources, participants will get an exclusive glimpse at the newly refreshed EAGLE training with the National White Collar Crimes Center. This NW3C training is IADLEST certified and can be redeemed for POST credit*.

*POST credit varies depending on state guidelines for POST.

PRESENTERS: Julie Schoen, Project Director, The National Center on Elder Abuse; and Richard Esquivel, Research Assistant, The National Center on Elder Abuse

Julie Schoen, JD, brings her passion for all aspects of aging issues to her role as the director of the Elder Abuse Guide for Law Enforcement (EAGLE) and Emeritus consultant for the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. She is an attorney with a strong background in Medicare Advocacy who is now serving in the Elder Justice field. Like you, she hopes to build public awareness by collaborating with experts in the field. She is an active board member of the San Clemente Village, USAging, and the National Organization of Victim Assistance (NOVA). 

 

Ricky Esquivel, MAMG, initially joined the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) as a student volunteer while obtaining his bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Aging and master’s degree in Medical Gerontology, both from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. In his current role, he serves as a Research Assistant for the NCEA and the Elder Abuse Guide for Law Enforcement (EAGLE) project.  He combines his interest in medicine with his passion for the care of older adults to spread awareness and prevent the abuse, neglect, and exploitation of older adults. 

 

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MAGNUS WORx: Neurobiology of Wellness and Well-being

Saturday, February 4  |  11:00am to 12:00pm

The purpose of this presentation is to review the neurobiology of Officers / Deputies Wellness (Mental, Emotional, Relationships, Resilience, Family, Physical, Leadership, Financial, occupational, Social and Spiritual) while introducing an integrative Approach for educating, impacting, inspiring and transcending Sheriff  deputies and personnel for RESULTS.

PRESENTER: Dr. Mitch Javidi, Founder, National Command and Staff College; and Jeff Kingsfield, Chief Strategy Officer, Rippleworx, Inc.

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Boomers, Slackers, and Snowflakes: Building a Multi-generational Leadership Team

Saturday, February 4  |  1:00pm to 2:00pm

As we deal with an ever-changing labor market, it has become even more important to have a multi-generational leadership team. We will discuss many of the benefits seen by the Jackson County Detention Center by building such a team and describe some of the techniques used to develop and manage that team to get the most out of it. Discussion will include embracing alternating leadership, encouraging crucial conversations, and developing leaders and expectations.

PRESENTER: Diana L. Knapp, Director of Corrections, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (MO); Sgt. Danny Barnes, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (MO); and Lucas Castilleja, Accreditation Manager, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (MO)

Diana Knapp’s career in criminal justice spans nearly three decades including work with adult and juvenile offenders in secure settings and in the community across state, federal and municipal levels.  She began her career with the Missouri Department of Corrections as a Probation and Parole Officer in Kansas City and was eventually promoted to managing the district probation and parole office in Boone County, Missouri.  Her journey included work as an institutional parole officer and case manager, unit manager, and assistant superintendent at an adult male facility.  After returning to Kansas City she opened a juvenile residential program for delinquent youth aging out of foster care in the state of Kansas, followed by a four year period managing a grant funded mental health program for municipal inmates in the metro KC area.  From there she managed a federally contracted halfway house for adult offenders, than transitioned to managing the juvenile residential and detention centers for the Jackson County Family Court.  She returned to the Jackson County Detention Center as the Deputy Director in late 2017 and was appointed Director in March, 2018. She has an undergraduate degree from Pittsburg State University in history and secondary education and a graduate degree from Columbia College in criminal justice administration.

Sgt. Danny Barnes has been a law enforcement officer with the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office for more than seventeen years and has spent the last twelve as a supervisor. He has worked a range of assignments, including patrol, investigations, and communications. He currently oversees the use of technology within the Sheriff’s Office to increase efficiency and improve services. Sgt. Barnes has a special interest in the relationships between law enforcement and corrections professionals, and views cooperation between the fields as critical to their respective missions.

 

 

Lucas Castilleja’s career started as a front-line worker in the Jackson County Juvenile Detention Center in Kansas City, MO. Over the next ten years, he held multiple positions within the organization, eventually being promoted to Superintendent of Detention. He has transitioned his skills to the adult detention center in Jackson County as the Accreditation Manager for the last four years.

 

 

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The Evolution of Medications for Opiate Use Disorder (MOUD)

Saturday, February 4  |  1:00pm to 2:00pm

This seminar will go over the jail programs for providing Medications for Opiate Use Disorder (MOUD or MAT). We’ll examine challenges jails face, concerns they have, DOJ expectations to be compliant with ADA, and the current state of litigation around MOUD. Our presenters will discuss what’s on the horizon with new federal legislation and new national guidelines. We will also dive into valuable resources including how to set up peer-to-peer meetings. 

PRESENTER: Dr. Marc Stern, Affiliate Assistant Professor of Public Health, U. of Washington, Senior Medical Advisor, National Sheriffs’ Association; Carrie Hill, Executive Director, Massachusetts Sheriffs’ Association, Chief Jail Advisor, National Sheriffs’ Association; and a TBD Sheriff

Dr. Marc Stern, M.D., M.P.H., is NSA’s Senior Medical Advisor.  Dr. Stern is an internist with 20 years of experience as a correctional physician in a variety of settings including as a jail medical director, a regional medical director for a state DOC, a regional medical director for a for-profit provider of health services to a state DOC, and as assistant secretary/medical director for a state DOC. He has provided consultation and assistance on correctional health care to a variety of organizations and agencies including DHS, USDOJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, California Attorney General, Human Rights Watch, ACLU National Prison Project, American Jail Association, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, and Federal courts. For the past 20 years he has worked closely with the National Commission on Correctional Health Care contributing to development of their prison and jail standards, teaching the standards, conducting accreditation visits, teaching on a variety of other topics, and serving as the principal author and teacher of a week-long Executive Manager in Correctional Health Care course developed in conjunction with the National Institute of Corrections/Federal BOP. Dr. Stern also conducts research and teaches at the University of Washington School Of Public Health, and chairs the Education committees of the American College of Correctional Physicians and the Academic Consortium on Criminal Justice Health.

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Investing Funds in Behavioral Health Services to Reduce Recidivism

Saturday, February 4  |  2:15pm to 3:15pm

Law enforcement officers are often the first responders when a person is experiencing a behavioral health crisis. In some cases, deputies are responding to the same individuals on a frequent basis. Individuals who are familiar faces to law enforcement cycle through local justice systems while underlying behavioral health needs remain unmet; however, some public safety leaders are trying to change that. From mental health clinicians to peer navigators, sheriffs and other law enforcement leaders across the country are investing funds from their own budgets in the behavioral health workforce and care coordination to provide the treatment and services to people in need to reduce recidivism.

PRESENTER: TBA

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Development of a COVID-19 Monitoring System for U.S. Correctional and Detention Facilities

Saturday, February 4  |  2:15pm to 3:15pm

The National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA) created a real-time data integration between the required data in detention and corrections facilities’ offender management systems, and the healthcare and medical systems they use, to securely capture, validate, and communicate COVID-19 data and information between cross-jurisdictional entities, CDC, state, and local health departments.  This data and information enables analysis and secure communication of COVID-19 prevention information and data.  This data system provides the information and data needed by cross-jurisdictional jails and prisons, CDC, state, and local health departments to help reduce morbidity and mortality.   Join this seminar to learn more about this pilot project and NSA’s plans to expand in the future.

PRESENTERS: Liesl Hagan; Dr. Marc Stern; Sean Mullin; Tom Blank

Dr. Marc Stern, M.D., M.P.H., is NSA’s Senior Medical Advisor.  Dr. Stern is an internist with 20 years of experience as a correctional physician in a variety of settings including as a jail medical director, a regional medical director for a state DOC, a regional medical director for a for-profit provider of health services to a state DOC, and as assistant secretary/medical director for a state DOC. He has provided consultation and assistance on correctional health care to a variety of organizations and agencies including DHS, USDOJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, California Attorney General, Human Rights Watch, ACLU National Prison Project, American Jail Association, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, and Federal courts. For the past 20 years he has worked closely with the National Commission on Correctional Health Care contributing to development of their prison and jail standards, teaching the standards, conducting accreditation visits, teaching on a variety of other topics, and serving as the principal author and teacher of a week-long Executive Manager in Correctional Health Care course developed in conjunction with the National Institute of Corrections/Federal BOP. Dr. Stern also conducts research and teaches at the University of Washington School Of Public Health, and chairs the Education committees of the American College of Correctional Physicians and the Academic Consortium on Criminal Justice Health.

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